Facts To know About the Abalone Shell

by Richieart
Facts To know About the Abalone Shell

Facts To know About the Abalone Shell

Facts To know About the Abalone Shell

Abalone is a common name for any of a group of small to very large marine gastropod molluscs in the family Haliotidae.

Other common names are ear shells, sea ears, and, rarely, muttonfish or muttonshells in parts of Australia, ormer in the UK, perlemoen in South Africa.

Facts To know About the Abalone Shell

Shells of abalones have a low, open spiral structure, and are characterized by several open respiratory pores in a row near the shell’s outer edge.

Abalone vary in size from 20 mm (0.8 in) to 200 mm (8 in) while Haliotis rufescens is the largest of the genus at 12 in (30 cm).

The shell of abalones is convex, rounded to oval in shape, and may be highly arched or very flattened. The shell of the majority of species has a small, flat spire and two to three whorls.

The exterior of the shell is striated and dull. The color of the shell is very variable from species to species, which may reflect the animal’s diet.

The shell of the abalone is exceptionally strong and is made of microscopic calcium carbonate tiles stacked like bricks. Between the layers of tiles is a clingy protein substance.

The meat (foot muscle) of abalone is used for food, and the shells of abalone are used as decorative items and as a source of mother of pearl for jewelry, buttons, buckles, and inlay.

Overfishing and poaching have reduced wild populations to such an extent that farmed abalone now supplies most of the abalone meat consumed.

You may also like

Leave a Comment

Life is good, Entertainment at its peak

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More

Privacy & Cookies Policy